Why You May Not Like Tim Tebow!

I had the opportunity to attend the live event for the Chick-Fil-A Leadercast this past Friday. It was a fantastic chance to turn off my work mind for a day and learn from proven leaders. With a slate of 12 or more speakers, it was also easy to find plenty of leadership material for this blog. One of the first items that stood out came from Coach Urban Meyer, former Florida Gators football coach. He finally answered the question I have had for years – Why do so many people dislike Tim Tebow?

Tebow

Tebow Is Clear About His Faith

If you follow sports at all, you clearly know of Tim Tebow. If you know of Tim Tebow, then you also know about his faith in Jesus Christ. You see, Tebow is open and up front about what he believes. His banner is clear. There is no question about where he stands on the issue of his faith.

You may not agree on his skill as a quarterback. Actually, Tebow is not concerned about that. He will tell you straight up that he is not concerned with his recognition as a great quarterback. No, his main concern is that you know where he stands with Jesus.

Is Tebow Too Vocal?

This is the very problem, some people will say. They say that he is too vocal. Many believe that Tebow should quiet down about his faith and just let his play on the football field do the talking. In fact, many Christians believe we should all keep our faith to ourselves, that it is a private matter. If we will just do this, they say, there will be more peace and tolerance.

Let’s put that argument on hold for a moment and get back to Coach Urban Meyer’s answer to the question, “Why do so many people dislike Tim Tebow?” When asked this question by Soledad O’Brien, CNN journalist, Coach Meyer responded insightfully. In fact, his answer makes total sense to me.

Urban Meyer Tells Why

Meyer first talked about his respect for Tim Tebow and the kind of man he is. He explained how Tebow had taught him more in their four years together than Meyer had learned in the 44 years prior! Finally, Meyer answered O’Brien’s question.

Meyer said Tebow is the kind of man that forces people to look inward, to self-evaluate.

Think about that. That statement says volumes! In fact, it is almost an exact match, in meaning, to a quote from Jim Elliot that I shared with you several days earlier! Look at this quote from Elliot’s prayer journal again…

Father, make of me a crisis man. Bring those I contact to decision. Let me not be a milepost on a single road; make me a fork, that men must turn one way or another on facing Christ in me.

Tim Tebow Is A Crisis Man

I don’t know about you, but I cannot get that quote out of my head. When I heard Meyer’s answer, this quote was the first thing that popped into my mind. It is clear to me that Tim Tebow is a “crisis man.” Whether he is familiar with this quote from Jim Elliot or not, I am betting that he has prayed a similar prayer. If so, God has clearly answered it.

For me, there are two take-aways from this post.

Take Away #1

The first is that too many people are uncomfortable with looking inward and self-evaluation. When forced to do so by people like Tim Tebow, they get frustrated, even angry. Unfortunately, this group of people includes Christians and non-Christians alike! This simply should not be so!

I think we should all commit to looking inwardly and self-evaluating on a regular basis. Just like the Psalmist, we should ask God to help us with this (Psalm 139:23-24). We cannot grow in our conforming to the likeness of Christ without doing this!

Take Away #2

The second take away is that I think we are all commanded to shine our lights. Scripture is clear that we are the light and this light is not to be hidden (Matthew 5:14-16). I am not recommending a run on bullhorns at the local sporting goods store! I am, however, suggesting that we all step up our game when it comes to raising our banner. Silence is not an option.

Are you willing to be a “crisis” man or woman?

How are you shining your light in your work?

If hidden, when are you going to uncover your light?


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  • Mary

    What a great article. Thank you for sharing this!!

    • http://www.ChristianFaithAtWork.com/ Chris Patton

      Thanks Mary! I appreciate you reading it!

  • http://www.struggletovictory.com/ Kari Scare

    We definitely tend to naturally gravitate toward people who confirm who we are rather than challenge us to be better. Hanging out with people who challenge us takes deliberate and intentional effort. People like to create their own reality, and having that reality challenged often causes them to buck up. Either that, or they just choose to remain ignorant. Great article!

    • http://www.ChristianFaithAtWork.com/ Chris Patton

      Great comments…Thanks Kari!

  • http://www.tnealtarver.wordpress.com TNeal

    I remember a story about a seminary professor asking his students, “Why do people not trust God?” After a long silence, he said, “Because they don’t know Him.”

    From what I’ve read of those who know Tim Tebow beyond the media sound bytes, they respect him and generally like him. The consistent picture drawn about time spent with Tebow is one of challenge and positive change.

    I like the point you make. Tim Tebow is a crisis man (a challenging phrase).

    • http://www.ChristianFaithAtWork.com/ Chris Patton

      A challenging phrase and a scary prayer…it is not one that will cause you to win a popularity contest (here).

    • http://www.ChristianFaithAtWork.com/ Chris Patton

      A challenging phrase and a scary prayer…it is not one that will cause you to win a popularity contest (here).

  • http://www.ChristianFaithAtWork.com/ Chris Patton

    Thanks D, I appreciate it!

  • http://www.ChristianFaithAtWork.com/ Chris Patton

    Thanks D, I appreciate it!

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